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Things to do in La Guajira

185 contributors
Beaches in Palomino
Palomino Beach
(7)
Beaches in Riohacha
Shrimp Beach (La Guajira)
(6)
Beaches in Riohacha
(7)
Beaches in Manaure
Manaure
Beaches in Riohacha
(1)
Beaches in Riohacha
(3)
Beaches in Riohacha
Mayapo
(2)
Beaches in Barrancas
(2)
Beaches in Uribia
Cabo beach
(1)
Beaches in Uribia
Beaches in Riohacha
Jorge House

The top 74 attractions in La Guajira

Nature Reserves in Cabo de la Vela
Cabo de la Vela
(30)
To visit the Cape of the Sail is to experience a place where the hand of man has not yet touched. The natural beauty of the site is out of this world; the purity of the sandy beaches, the crystal clear sea and blue skies. There are no typical tourist spots, only the natural beauty of the Cape, which is especially evident at sunset.
Beaches in Palomino
Palomino Beach
(7)
Palomino beaches is an excellent place to meet, have fun, pass time with loved ones and relax. Located in Palomino within La Guajira on Colombia's Caribbean coast, the atmosphere is magical atmosphere and the unique landscape along with the rivers flowing into the sea and the view of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta make it a picturesque setting.
Beaches in Uribia
El Pilón de Azúcar Beach (La Vela Cape)
(3)
Another beach paradise of [poi = 124032] Cabo de la Vela [/ poi] is that which the great guardian [poi = 124555] Pilon de Azucar [/ poi] protects. It's a sheer mountain that falls into the sea, from which the views of the Cape are awesome. The beach is about a 40 minute walk from the village. Despite the heat, the effort is worthwhile. You'll pass through mountains of cactus, orange deserts, and an endearing [poi = 124574] Wayuu cemetery [/ poi]. You won't believe your eyes once you get there. The breaking waves are loud, but they aren't dangerous, and the sea is incredibly warm. Amazing.
Nature Reserves in Riohacha
Wildlife Sanctuary of Flamingos
(1)
Wherever you may come from, Santa Marta or Riohacha, to reach the Los Flamencos Sanctuary you have to take a motorcycle taxi. The motorcycle will drop you off on the beach, where once a year the lagoon empties. There you have to hire a boat to take you slowly and silently up to the huge colony of pink flamingos living in the reserve. The experience is touching. The boatman, mine was named Robinson Paramo, advances his boat on the shallow water with a long pole. The sight of flamingos is wonderful. They are very pink, their beauty filling the depth of the lagoon.
Of Cultural Interest in Uribia
Sacred Mountain Pilón de Azúcar (Cabo de la Vela)
(1)
The Pilón de Azúcar, along with the Cabo de la Vela, are the two most popular tourist destinations of La Guajira, in the Colombian Caribbean closer to Venezuela. The Pilón de Azúcar is a white rock in the sea, and is known, by the Indians, as Kamaici, lord of the sea things. It has a deep mythological significance. Crowned with an image of the Virgin of Fatima, it's located around spectacularly beautiful beaches. I would recommended [poi = 124553] sleeping in a hammock [/ poi] in a Wayuu cabin near the Cabo de la Vela.
Villages in Uribia
Uribia
(2)
Uribia is a market town of La Alta Guajira, inhabited almost entirely by native Wayuu people. Here are concentrated goods arriving from nearby Maicao (12 kilometers from the border with Venezuela), most of them smuggled product. From Uribia trucks leave to enter Cape Candle. These depart from Market Street only during the morning, and are heavily loaded with people and goods. Trucks and vans are parked in a row and just ask they will tell you which leaves first. Then it is a matter of jumping in the back, paying and waiting for the adventure to begins in Guajira.
Of Touristic Interest in Uribia
Sunset at Vela Cape
(1)
As if it were a pilgrimage, the few tourists that visit this area, go out near the Vela Cape, a small mound, to see how is sun disappears below the horizon. While you'll always find people, it is one of the best places I have found to meditate and relax.
Of Touristic Interest in Cabo de la Vela
Cabo de la Vela Lighthouse
(4)
Revel in the Cape, is History is for the traditions of the indigenous Wayuu, since they guess that is where they in the afterlife, the souls of the dead. The place has a lighthouse that acts as a guide for navigators. The geographical location of Cabo de la Vela allowed it to become a historical place for its fishing industry, which is exhausted currnently, it is said out there in an iron mine, its coral reefs, the lovely stone that retains its value. The headland forming it is a spur of the mountains of carpenters, emerging coiled to form the lovely cove. This promontory served at the time of the conquest of guidance to ships coming from Mexico and the Orinoco, on the way to land, washed by the Caribbean. During the colony it acted as a port of call to the ships traveling to Spain back from there to Santo Domingo, the Darien, Panama, Cuba and Central America. Out front of the islet is Farallon, a rock beaten by the waves whose edges act as perches and nests to flocks of seabirds. This rock, by the whiteness of guano, beaten by the sun, look like one of the snowy peaks of the Sierra de Santa Marta, also the rock is similar to Morro de Santa Marta in scale.
Of Cultural Interest in Uribia
Los Wayúu (La Guajira)
(1)
The people of [poi = 124025] Guajira [/ poi], both in Colombia and Venezuela, are the Wayuu, one of the few ethnic groups that were never conquered or dominated. Owners of a desert land that is desolate and poor, the Wayuu have been forgotten and out of the modern world for centuries, hence they retain their ancestral customs and language that is now taught in regional schools. The Wayuu family clans are matriarchal. The women wear 'blankets', or long loose tunics, that cover the entire body. They are skilled weavers and take care of the home, while the men fish or herd animals. The Wayuu are minimalist and the [poi = 127598] villages [/ poi] are very poor. There is no running water or electricity.
Beaches in Riohacha
Shrimp Beach (La Guajira)
(6)
One comes to Camerones because you crave visiting the Wildlife Park of the Flamingos and to discover that their beach is amazing. Rural landscape as whole Guajira, the orange sand beach is dotted with colorful fishing boats and nets.
Beaches in Riohacha
(7)
Roads in Uribia
By Truck to la Vela Cape
(3)
There is no other way to get to Paradise. To access [poi = 124032] Cape Candle [/ poi] you have to travel by truck or van from [poi = 124027] Uribia [/ poi]. The travelling will be tight, you'll be surrounded by merchandise that the driver delivers to the [poi = 127598] Wayuu settlements [/ poi] among which are boxes of food, dust, people and live goats. And it's bumpy, so you have to cling to the bars of the truck's roof so you don't fall out. Because the trail is unpaved and full of holes, and the driver, who will really want to shorten the trip, will take a shortcut across the fields. The trip to Cabo de la Vela is through a desolate and surreal landscape of [poi = 124025] Guajira [/ poi] that lasts a little over an hour and a half. You go through areas full of cactus, salt deserts and orange earth where you start to hallucinate. You feel like you're going to the end of the world, and that you're leaving everything behind and moving into another dimension, remote, wild, and unspoiled.
Of Touristic Interest in Cabo de la Vela
El Pilón de Azucar
(3)
According to the stories of the Wayuu indigenous culture, there were three brothers, the offspring of an important chieftain, who decided to flip the guajira, the first rested on the sides of Uribía and became determined not to follow the arduous trek and sat down to rest, fell asleep and became the hill of Teta. The other 2 brothers followed along the guajira, experiencing many adventures in unknown places and reached the northern tip of the peninsula and decided to return looking the sea. Their strength was weak and the second brother decided he should sit and lay down in the desert. He also fell into a deep sleep and became the Serrania de la Mucuira. The third brother continued his solitary journey and after sailing arrived at the cape. At this point thirst was taking over, he found the water in the Cape. Now tired he refreshed himself and like his two brothers fell asleep, eventually becoming the Pilon de Azucar. These are the most important elevations of Guajira. My friend Jose Gonzales told me this story when he accompanied me throughout the guajira. It was 23 years ago when we drove this itinerary to the stores for the people living in the Wayuu indigenous community. Covenio FUNDICAR - Yanama - Carbocol - Intercur.
Beaches in Uribia
Turtle Island Beach (Cape of the Sail)
From Cape Candle you have a thousand options for adventure. One is to explore, on foot, the only way to move in this remote area of ​ Guajira - the coast on the other side of the cape, unless repaired and very rugged. A fantastic beach is located opposite Turtle Island. The site is spectacular. Unlike the long beach of Cabo de la Vela, here the sea is big waves, but is perfect for bathing. The environment is another world. Fantastic, unreal paradise.
Of Touristic Interest in Manaure
Salinas de Manaure
(1)
Situated in the department of La Guajira, it has access to all tourist routes that lead to Cabo de La Vela, although it is not too spectacular. Here you can see the process of how they collect salt. From when it is in the refinery mixed in with water to when the salt is in piles getting ready to be packed and shipped for consumption.
Of Cultural Interest in Uribia
Four Tracks
Cuatro Vias is just a crossroads in Guajira, but is important because the place has become a big market, especially Wayuu traditional food. Here you get off the bus coming from Riohacha to take another (or a shared taxi, because the distance is short) to Uribia. The site is very rustic and humble, it is interesting and picturesque. At least I enjoyed it, the Wayuu beautiful women, dressed in their typical 'blankets', were concentrated in their kitchens, decorating their cheese bread and chunks of roasted goat meat.
Cemeteries in Uribia
Cemetery Wayúu (Cabo de la Vela)
Earth orange and iridescent. The round sun, resounding eternal heat, the breeze that never comes. Cactus forests, dry ponds, small white reflecting saline ponds. The road to the Pilon de Azucar in the middle of nowhere and suddenly I see a humble cemetery Wayuu. It is surrounded by logs stuck in the sand. Inside, small vaults, earth floors, white painted adobe doors. The place feels a world away. It has a special silence, a particular energy. Strong, deep-stirring.
Of Cultural Interest in Uribia
Villages Wayuu (La Guajira)
(1)
Whether sea shores on Cabo de la Vela, or inland, the villages of Wayuu are extremely humble, and lack basic needs. Their houses, sometimes surrounded by a fence of cactus, are made of coarse wood or branches thatched roofs and sand floors. The Wayuu sleep in hammocks in the same room where they cook, eat and meet the family. They have no running water or electricity, the water reaches them once a week or every 10 days in a tanker. Most homes have an electrical generator that lights until 9 or 10 at night, but in the rest of the village after sunset complete darkness reigns.